Well that's my secondary reason for leaving: I'm basically guaranteed a UK visa and if I can survive for 6 years (with or without a job) then I can apply for a passport.

variablepulserate.10centuries.org.

Hm, maybe I could become one of the few foreigners to speak Manx. That should get me citizenship pretty quickly, right?

variablepulserate.10centuries.org.

Almost entirely political. I don't think I've really felt "safe" since the protests started and that was pretty much 3 years ago now. I don't think that's going to change until I get out: I don't see this place changing direction anytime soon.

matigo.ca.

Every time I look around the apartment and take account of what I have, the first question that comes to mind is "How much do I need to get rid of before I leave?" The second question is "How much is it realistic and affordable to ship?"

It seems almost comical to some that my deadline for getting out is when my gym membership expires, but that's the longest commitment I paid for upfront. It's all arbitrary anyway: in theory, there's nothing stopping me selling all my stuff for pennies today and just getting on the next flight, even if the finances don't feel like they quite work out at the moment. (Although I don't think I'll ever feel like they do, especially with income taxes being what they are in the parts of the world I think I'd be happier in. If the poverty mindset is in any way genetic, then I've likely inherited it to some extent from my dad, who actually grew up relatively poor.)

All rather depressing and certainly not doing my mental health any favours, but I've watched myself get progressively unhappier (net) over the last few years, so staying would almost certainly be worse, and selling stuff takes time, so delaying that isn't an option.

It's funny how some small behaviours have changed in light of all this: I try to look out of the window more when I take the bus, and to prefer the bus over the train. Every moment with friends here feels just a little bit more important.

(It's not like this would be my first time leaving — it's just that, in previous times, coming back felt like a door that would always be wide open. Now I'm not so sure.)

I used to be completely addicted to sugar: close to 1L of soft drinks per day, bags of Oreos in a sitting, most fast food milkshakes tasted "normal"…. My parents never complained about me eating too much fast food or anything of the sort; all they knew about nutrition back then was that I was underweight and could do with eating a little more.

Quit soft drinks cold turkey in 2008 (my own decision) and severely restricted my snacking at the same time; the rest happened pretty slowly after that until I started dedicating a lot of time to tasting (alcohol, coffee, tea…) around late 2013.

Sugary stuff is basically incompatible with a lot of nice drinks, so there's little temptation to go back, though I do splurge once in a while. Soft drinks, though, are a few-time-a-year thing: stopping cold turkey is still one of the hardest things I've ever done and I don't want to go through that again. Also most soft drinks taste awful to me now, Fentiman's being a notable exception.

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variablepulserate.10centuries.org.

Interesting. Most chocolates I've had under 70% are sickeningly sweet and I find myself preferring 80%+.

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variablepulserate.10centuries.org.

Not the Type S, just the regular HHKB 2. HKD 750.

matigo.ca.

The last time I was in Japan — Tokyo, 2016–2017 (Christmas/New Year) — I tried a Happy Hacking keyboard at one of the big electronics stores. I was so tempted to get it then but couldn't justify the price.

4 years later, I have one, second hand and in perfect condition. HHKB 2, not the latest and the Hasu programmable controllers seem impossible to get right now, but it's lovely.

Could well be. A lot of computing is more ordered and demanding of conformity now, thanks to our walled gardens.

variablepulserate.10centuries.org.

You have been remarkably trusting in this relationship.

matigo.ca.